A baseball player screwed up, but his apology can teach us all a big lesson.

A baseball player screwed up, but his apology can teach us all a big lesson.
Kevin Pillar screwed up. Here's what he's doing to fix it.<br>A professional baseball player just demonstrated what a good, genuine apology should look like.After striking out during Wednesday's game between the Toronto Blue Jays and the Atlanta Braves, Blue Jays outfielder Kevin Pillar had some choice words for Braves' pitcher Jason Motte, and things got heated. During the exchange, Pillar shouted a homophobic slur at Motte. Pillar during an April game against the Boston Red Sox. Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images. It wasn't a good look for Pillar, and he knew it. The next day, he offered an apology to both Motte and the larger LGBTQ community.Emotions were clearly running pretty high, but the next day on Twitter, Pillar shared a heartfelt message of remorse:"Last night, following my at-bat in the 7th inning, I used inappropriate language towards Braves pitcher Jason Motte. By doing so, I had just helped extend the use of a word that has no place in baseball, in sports or anywhere in society today. I'm completely and utterly embarrassed and feel horrible to have put the fans, my teammates and the Blue Jays organization in this position. I have apologized personally to Jason Motte, but also need to apologize to the Braves organization and their fans, and most importantly, to the LGBTQ community for the lack of respect I displayed last night. This is not who I am and will use this as an opportunity to better myself."There are three elements to an effective apology, and Pillar's message is a great example we can all look to.Because let's be real: We all screw up, and there's always an opportunity to grow from our own mistakes. The question is whether we want to. Here's how to do it, according to experts. Pillar during an October 2015 game against the Texas Rangers. Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images. Christine Carter, a senior fellow at the University of California-Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center, outlines the three key components of effective apol