Check out Budweiser's powerful Super Bowl ad celebrating immigrants.

Check out Budweiser's powerful Super Bowl ad celebrating immigrants.
'Go back home!' — a message immigrants have been hearing for a while now.<br>In 1857, a man named Adolphus Busch arrived in America. As an immigrant from Germany, he stood out. Some people didn't like that. Like many other immigrants in the 1800s, he faced hardships on his journey to find his new home. But he finally made it to where he was meant to be. Busch, of course, is the Busch of Anheuser-Busch — the world's largest beer producer. And it's his American story being told in a new Super Bowl ad for Budweiser:Given today's political climate, the ad's pro-immigrant sentiment has people talking.The ad — showing Busch overcoming xenophobic attitudes held by early colonists — was released amid talks of President Donald Trump's controversial U.S.-Mexico border wall and just days after Trump signed an executive order banning travel to the U.S. by green card holders and refugees from seven predominantly Muslim countries. The ban prompted protests in airports across the country. It resulted in Attorney General Sally Yates being fired by Trump for refusing to defend its legality. Lawyers swooped in immediately, many working pro bono, to defend those affected in transit. And dozens of celebrities and influencers slammed the ban as an attack on civil rights.And believe it or not, Anheuser-Busch dove into white-hot political territory with this ad ... on accident. Demonstrators protest Trump's travel ban in Chicago. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images. Anheuser-Busch didn't intend for the ad — which it's been developing for nearly a year — to be political.The commercial was conceptualized long before Trump's travel ban was signed and the announcement of his controversial proposal to pay for the U.S.-Mexico border wall using an import tariff. The brand wanted to "celebrate those who embody the American spirit" by recapping one of its founder's early days in America — not throw in its two cents when it comes to immigration policy.Marcel Marcondes, vice president of m