<p>11 powerful photos to remind Trump just how horrific nuclear war truly is.</p>

<p>11 powerful photos to remind Trump just how horrific nuclear war truly is.</p>
Dozens of demonstrators gathered outside California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on Aug. 9, 2017.The facility is used for nuclear weapons research. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images. The very same August day 72 years ago, the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan.The blast came just three days after the U.S. dropped the bomb on Hiroshima. Once a bustling city, Nagasaki was transformed into rubble and ash. Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images. The victims of the two attacks, which prompted the bloody and devastating end of World War II, still live in the memories of the protesters in Livermore.“We are here to stand with the survivors of that nuclear attack, but we are also here to stop the next nuclear war before it starts,” demonstrator Marylia Kelley told SF Gate. Demonstrators stage a "die-in" to remind the public of the lives lost in nuclear warfare. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images. More than seven decades have passed since the first use of nuclear warfare forever changed our world.The protesters' message is simple: The horrific consequences of those weapons should never be forgotten. The blast in Nagasaki, seen from about six miles away. Photo by Hiromichi Matsuda/Handout from Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum/Getty Images. Estimates vary, but it's generally believed that at least 150,000 people in Hiroshima and 75,000 people in Nagasaki were killed in the blasts.Those figures don't count the thousands more who died of illnesses related to radiation exposure in the months and years that followed. A Japanese victim of the atomic explosion in Nagasaki. Photo courtesy of National Archives/Newsmakers. Beyond the cost of human life, the physical destruction of both cities was unprecedented.About 92% of Hiroshima's structures were either destroyed or damaged in the blast, according to the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. Bustling metropolitan areas became decimated wastelands. The aftermath of the atomic attack on Nagasaki. Photo by AFP/