<p>Behind the viral push to save one of the most inclusive shows on TV.</p>

<p>Behind the viral push to save one of the most inclusive shows on TV.</p>
If Cameron Esposito and Rhea Butcher can do it, so can Hollywood's biggest names. The good news: A really funny, awesomely diverse sitcom wrapped up work on its second season. The bad news: You might never get to see it.Any Seeso subscribers in the house? Likely not, and that's kind of what's causing this predicament. On Wednesday, the NBCUniversal-backed comedy streaming service announced plans to shut down after about a year and a half in operation. It's sad news, too, because Seeso was home to "Take My Wife," a critically acclaimed sitcom from IRL married duo Cameron Esposito and Rhea Butcher. The show follows the slightly fictionalized lives of Esposito and Butcher as they try to find personal and professional success. The premise — comedians just trying to make it in the real world — is well-worn territory, but you've almost certainly never seen it done like this.The show's second season recently finished filming, but with Seeso calling it quits, there's no telling if and when it will ever air.It's an important show, and it's absolutely worth saving.In case "Take My Wife" never finds a home (hopefully it will), Esposito tweeted a few important stats about the second season's production — specifically, the demographics of the cast and crew. Wanted to tell u what having a show on Seeso allowed us to do. I am so proud of #TakeMyWife. pic.twitter.com/UatqOyrPY7— Cameron Esposito (@cameronesposito) August 9, 2017 She urged followers to retweet her original post and help spread the message using the #TakeMyWife hashtag. The outpouring of support for this tweet is getting folx on the phone. Pls keep it going for #TakeMyWife https://t.co/1Dqpsky8I7— Cameron Esposito (@cameronesposito) August 10, 2017 People of color, women, and members of the LGBTQ community are under-represented both in front of and behind the camera. "Take My Wife" set out to change that.A report from the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA looked at 200 top-grossing film