River piracy may be climate change's weirdest effect. It just happened in Canada.

River piracy may be climate change's weirdest effect. It just happened in Canada.
<br>Kluane Lake in Canada is supposed to look like this: Image via Mandruss/Wikimedia Commons. The lake is one of Yukon's largest, home to a handful of small communities, and its waters eventually feed into the mighty Yukon River.So how the heck did it end up looking like this virtually overnight? Image via Jim Best/University of Illinois. It's supposed to be pristine and blue, not brown and full of weird, muddy goosebumps and dry, dusty mudflats.This is a shocking case of what scientists call "river piracy." Something stole Kluane Lake's river.The culprit wasn't a foul-mouthed, foul-smelling 17th-century sailor, though. The real culprit was — and is — much more creeping and insidious.Kluane Lake used to get a big chunk of its water from the Slims River, which in turn was fed by the Kaskawulsh glacier. For years, the Slims River had been an ice-cold torrent of water up to 10 feet deep and too strong to wade through in some areas. Over the course of four days in May 2016, though, river gauge data shows that all of that water just ... disappeared. An aerial view of water being diverted from the Slims River. Image via Dan Shugar/University of Washington Tacoma. Dan Shugar and Jim Best, scientists from the University of Washington and University of Illinois, went up to investigate in person. When they got there, they found a bare trickle of water where the river should have been."We were really surprised when we got there and there was basically no water in the river," Shugar said in an Associated Press report. "We could walk across it and we wouldn't get our shirts wet.”They knew if something was stopping water from getting to the river, it must have happened uphill, likely at the mighty Kaskawulsh glacier that feeds the river. When the scientists went to investigate, they found a massive 100-foot-tall ice canyon — a giant hole basically — inside the glacier's edge. The ice-walled canyon. Image via Jim Best/University of Illinois. It was the evidence they needed