They're here: photos released of 8 female activists that history almost forgot.

They're here: photos released of 8 female activists that history almost forgot.
<br>If you picture the Victorian era in America, what do you see? Probably the Wild West, or maybe some dude in a top hat.But the late-1800s were also a hotbed of activism and civil rights struggles, especially among women and African-Americans. History books tend to name a select few, like Sojourner Truth or Booker T. Washington.But the truth is, we forget that real change is only possible thanks to the labor of countless individuals.We’re now getting another chance to peer into the past thanks to the Library of Congress. In 2013, the Library of Congress got a hold of the photograph collection of William Henry Richards, a prominent African-American leader who taught at Howard University from 1890 to 1928. In the collection, they found portraits of the young, badass female African-American activists whom Richards worked alongside.1. People like Maria Baldwin Photo by Elmer Chickering. Image via the Library of Congress. Baldwin was a teacher and civics leader. In 1889, she became principal of the Agassiz Grammar School, turning it into one of the best schools in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 2. Hallie Quinn Brown Photo by F. S. Biddle. Image via the Library of Congress. A dean, professor, and lecturer, Brown founded civics organizations, spoke at national political conventions, and represented the United States at the 1899 International Congress of Women.3. Anna J. Cooper Photo by Falor & Smedley. Image via the Library of Congress. Another notable educator, Cooper wrote "A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South," which called for equal education and the advancement of other opportunities for black women.4. Lillian Parker Thomas Photo by Giers & Koellein. Image via the Library of Congress. Thomas, a journalist, was a local and correspondent editor for the New York Freeman, and she is believed to have been the first black woman to be a professional theater critic.5. Clarissa M. Thompson Image via the Library of Congress. Thompson was a poet, novelist, edu