Trump's voter fraud commission asked the public for comments. They're absolutely brutal.

Trump's voter fraud commission asked the public for comments. They're absolutely brutal.
The homepage for the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity Resources, aka Donald Trump's "voter fraud" commission, contains the following instruction:"Any member of the public wishing to submit written comments for the Commission’s consideration may do so via email at ElectionIntegrityStaff@ovp.eop.gov. Please note that the Commission may post such written comments publicly on our website, including names and contact information that are submitted."The committee was established in the wake of Trump's unsubstantiated claim that "millions" voted illegally in the 2016 election with the goal of investigating voter impersonation. Trump with commission co-chair Kris Kobach. Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images. Between June 29 and July 11, the commission, chaired by Vice President Mike Pence and former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, received nearly 100 emails from voters. True to their word, they posted them publicly — without redacting names or e-mail addresses.Only four were supportive of the project. The rest expressed fear, resentment, and opposition. Many bluntly. Some laced with profanity. Turns out, many Americans aren't too thrilled about having their private information complied in a massive public database. Photo by John Sommers II/Getty Images. "When you call the bank, do they ask for your full social or just the last 4?" one voter wrote, expressing concern over the form asking for part of his SSID number. "So if someone wanted access to my bank account information, the address, full name, DOB and last four social is EXACTLY what they would need."Some took issue with the sketchy policy record of the comission's leaders. "This commission is a sham and Kris Kobach has been put on it expressly to disenfranchise minority voters," a California voter replied. "I am ashamed that my taxpayer dollars are being used for such purposes.Others argued that the commission should investigate Russian interference instead. "What you should be addressing