Watch Audi's bold, touching, and totally feminist Super Bowl ad.

Watch Audi's bold, touching, and totally feminist Super Bowl ad.
<br>"What do I tell my daughter?""Do I tell her that her grandpa is worth more than her grandma? That her dad is worth more than her mom?" GIF via Audi/YouTube. "Do I tell her that — despite her education, her drive, her skills, her intelligence — she will automatically be valued less than every man she ever meets?""Or maybe, I'll be able to tell her something different." GIF via Audi/YouTube. Those are the narrator's words in a powerful new Super Bowl ad by Audi that highlights pay inequity. Check it out below:  Clearly, Audi's not shying away from using the big game to make a political statement.Pay inequity, a hot topic on the 2016 campaign trail, has become an increasingly important issue to many Americans.Today, women earn, on average, a measly 79 cents for every dollar a man makes. The wage gap is even more severe for women of color — with black women earning about 64 cents and Latina women earning about 56 cents for every dollar that finds its way into the wallet of a man doing the same job.That 79 cents figure, however, doesn't quite tell the whole story.There are many factors that play into the wage gap aside from discrimination. For instance, women tend to leave the workforce when they have children (which sets them back on the pay scale in the long term) and are more likely to seek out jobs with more flexible hours at the expense of a higher salary, The Washington Post noted. There are other social factors at play, too, like the fact women are less likely to negotiate their starting salaries and are more hesitant to apply for a job that they're not 100% qualified for (this isn't the case for men). Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images. But again, that's still only telling part of the story.The ad received a lot of criticism from viewers who jumped at the chance to explain why they think pay inequity isn't a real problem."Women at Audi work different jobs, which accounts for the perceived unequal pay," a Twitter user criticized the brand."Equal pay [s